8 Tips for Back to School During COVID-19

Here we are again, with a new school year right around the corner. We all know that this year won’t be anything like what we’re used to, or what we hoped for… those fresh supplies, cute outfits, and all the “first day of school” pictures spamming our Facebook feed. Your family might be mourning what should have been, or you might be stressed just thinking about how you’re ever going to manage it all. Regardless of the initial opening decision your school has made, or what you have decided is best for your family, there is a lot of uncertainty ahead of us this fall and winter.

 

Below are a collection of tips and strategies I’ve put together for making the most (or maybe just surviving) this coming school year. It won’t look like a “normal” fall, but maybe we can still make it a good one.

 

  1. Plan a daily routine

Take the time before the year begins to plan out a daily schedule and family routine. It is tempting to let everyone sleep in as much as possible and log into their Zoom sessions from bed, but it won’t be the best scenario for truly learning or engaging. Having structure and goals to work towards will set up your students for success and give them a sense of security and predictability.

 

  1. Verify Materials

Make sure you have everything your kids will need to be successful. Your supply list this year might be fewer pens and markers and folders, and more along the lines of a PDF reader, note-taking apps, noise-canceling headphones, a stable WiFi connection, and pertinent account log-in information.

 

You might also think about purchasing some of those fresh, fun supplies, even if you won’t really need them. Maintaining a sense of normalcy will be important for everyone’s sanity. Some fun or pretty things for the kids to start the year with might go a long way for keeping their spirits up.

 

  1. Create a Learning Environment

Everyone knows the learning environment is important. A space too isolated could create opportunity to slack off. Sitting at the kitchen table might prove to be too distracting. Really think about what each person’s needs are and be prepared to move or switch things around if you find something isn’t working well.

 

When creating everyone’s work space, think about distractions, comfort, and access to power. Try to eliminate distractions as much as possible. Background noise or music can help with concentration. Help your child create a playlist of soothing music, or try an app like this one for productivity and focus.

 

  1. Plan Each Day

This is not the same as your family routine or school schedule. Help your student to make a plan for each day by taking a few minutes every morning to look at their schedule and assignments, and create a specific plan for that specific day. This will be especially helpful for older kids who might have lots of projects to juggle and independent work that can easily lead to feeling overwhelmed.

 

  1. Center the Child, Not the Work

This may not be for every household, as it’s definitely more of a parenting philosophy. Some families may find it much more important during this uncertain time to prioritize working hard, rather than getting good grades. If nothing else, keep in mind that we are in unprecedented times, and everyone deserves some grace as we move through this. Our children included.

 

  1. Encourage a Growth Mindset

A growth mindset doesn’t put the focus on what they’re learning in school, but rather how to think about what they’re learning. Developing a growth mindset will help your student reframe how they approach challenges in every aspect of their life. Kids with a growth mindset believe that their abilities, intelligence, and performance can improve over time. It’s the subtle difference between “I can’t do this homework. I don’t understand science.” and “I can’t do this homework yet. I don’t understand how to make sense of this problem.” Students with growth mindset see mistakes as ways to learn and will persist in the face of setbacks. We all need more of this, pandemic or not.

 

 

  1. Mask Prep

Even if your school is 100% remote learning for the beginning of the year, we should be preparing our kids now for the possibility of a hybrid learning model that will hopefully come later in the school year. Most of us are familiar by now with wearing masks to the grocery store or in the park, but those situations are not the same as wearing a mask for 7 hours straight during a school day. Start preparing your student now for extended mask wearing.

  • Make sure you have several masks that properly fit your child.
  • Practice is key. Don’t expect perfection at first, especially with younger kids. Just know that the more they wear masks, the more comfortable they will feel. Practicing at home gives them a safe space to take it off when they need a break.
  • Build endurance. Start small, the way you would with any new habit. Have them wear the mask for small increments of time, and gradually build up.
  • Make it fun. Do fun activities while they have it on. Let them pick out the colors or the fabric, or buy plain ones along with fabric paint and let them design their own. Disposable masks can be personalized with stickers around the edges. Help them enjoy wearing the mask by letting it reflect their personality.
  • Explain the “why”. Children need to know why they have to wear the mask. Talk to them about germs and how the mask helps to prevent spreading sickness. Have lots of conversations with your teens and middle-school kids so they are armed with facts and information in case they experience peer pressure to stop wearing it.
  • Model what you want your kids to imitate. When you are asking your child to wear a mask, you should wear it along with them, even around the home when they are practicing.

 

  1. Exercise Daily

This might get difficult when the winter weather sets in, but it is so important that we are all exercising every day. Even just a 30 minute walk does wonders for our bodies and our minds. Physical activity will make your student feel better, function better, learn better, and sleep better. It will reduce anxiety and improve overall health. Make this one a priority!


Posted on August 14, 2020 at 2:29 PM
Windermere Real Estate North | Posted in Living |

What is Happening with Home Prices?

What is Happening with Home Prices?

It is without question we are living in one of the most unique times in all of our lives. Who would have thought we’d experience living life during a global pandemic? Beyond staying safe, adjusting daily habits, and navigating a changing economy, I’ve kept a very close eye on the housing market. With Windermere’s Chief Economist, Matthew Gardner as one of my guides, I am happy to report that housing has been a bright light in the economy during a very challenging time.

May unemployment numbers settled around 13%, an improvement over April, but still far from the 5% we started out with at the beginning of 2020. We are also embarking on our second quarter of retraction in GDP which is the textbook definition of a recession. Many experts are predicting a V-shaped recovery and I’d venture to say that we are currently at the bottom of the V. 

With stay-at-home orders being lifted or eased depending on what part of the country you live in, we are starting to see jobs come back.  Conversely, we are also seeing some industries thrive, but we will also witness some businesses be required to pivot to remain relevant or go away altogether. For example, tech is thriving and aerospace is not. The reorganization and re-prioritizing that is occurring will be impactful to many, some positive and some challenging.

In our region of the country, we entered into this pandemic with a thriving economy and a strong housing market. In January it was predicted that we would see a year-over-year price appreciation of around 5%. This health crisis will slow that level of appreciation, but we are not expecting losses.

Spring is typically our busiest time in the market with many sellers coming to market and buyers shopping in order to land in their new home by summer and the start of the fall school season. COVID-19 and the associated limitations in our daily activities along with employment disruption created a slowdown in our typical spring market. The largest impact has been the amount of available inventory to choose from. Amazingly, the housing market has continued to hum along with many buyers still eager to purchase. Inventory is down 40% year-over-year and buyer demand is strong, creating a frenzy in some price ranges and neighborhoods.

According to Joel Kan, Economist for the Mortgage Bankers Association mortgage applications are on the rise and up 5% from the same time last year. Summer is looking to be the re-invented spring market as our country starts to re-open. Interest rates are the lowest they have ever been, which is encouraging buyers to act and creating a good-sized audience for sellers.

Below is a video where Matthew speaks to his predicted trajectory for home prices as we travel through the second half of 2020 and beyond. Also, note below the latest statistic for both King and Snohomish Counties for the month of May.

 

 

It is always my goal to report real-time numbers from the front lines and do my best to explain what is happening.  I choose to look at the numbers in tight snippets week-by-week and also dig deep on year-over-year numbers. Right now, we are reporting growth from March and starting to return to the same amount of activity that we saw at the same time last year. We must keep a close eye on unemployment figures and mortgage forbearance reporting, both of which are improving but still have a ways to go.

It is my goal to help keep my clients informed and empower strong decisions by studying the stats and reporting my day-to-day observations. Please reach out if you or someone you know has questions or concerns. These are unprecedented times and knowledge is one of your most powerful tools. I am honored to be your trusted advisor.

 

 

 

 Congrats Class of 2020!

The class of 2020 deserves a huge congratulations! The milestone of finishing elementary school, junior high, high school or college is always worth noting, but this class is extra-special!! They have navigated distance learning and missed out on the proper celebrations, but they’ve shown resilience and finished strong. The world is proud of you and so am I!

 

 

A heartfelt thank you to all the teachers, administrators and staff that helped guide all the students this school year!  Distance learning is not for the faint of heart and the teachers are amongst the heroes during this challenging time!

 


Posted on June 10, 2020 at 1:53 PM
Windermere Real Estate North | Posted in Living, Local Market Analysis, Newsletter, Uncategorized |

Are we Headed Towards a Repeat of the 2008 Housing Meltdown?

Are we Headed Towards a Repeat of the 2008 Housing Meltdown?

The pressure the COVID-19 global pandemic is putting on the economy is a reality. As a real estate broker, I take great pride in having the honor of being your trusted advisor when it comes to your investment in the housing market and protecting the value of your home. I have been asked several times, “Is this the Great Recession all over again?”

At Windermere, we have continued to rely on the expertise of Matthew Gardner, Windermere’s Chief Economist. Above is a chart he shared from Black Knight Financial comparing the housing market as we headed into this global health crisis versus the start of the Great Recession in 2007. Below is an 11-minute video going over the chart line by line. I urge you to watch the video and key in to his expertise versus what you might hear in the media. Matthew predicted the Great Recession and does not shy away from heeding the truth, even if it is not great news. I trust him and I hope you do too.

Bottom line, we are heading into this economic challenge with a much more formidable foundation based on more stringent lending practices, higher equity levels, and we are anticipating a shorter 1-2 year V-shaped recovery, compared to the long U-shaped recovery of the 5-year Great Recession. In fact, we have seen pending sales rise over the last three consecutive weeks, some even with multiple offers. Every neighborhood and every price-point has its own story. Please reach out with any questions or concerns. It is my goal to help keep you informed and empower strong decisions.

 

 

 

 

We’re on a mission to help our local food banks keep their shelves stocked during this uncertain time. For every dollar our office raises, the Windermere Foundation is matching up to $3,500 through May 5th! This is a part of a total of $250,000 in matching funds from the Windermere Foundation, with the goal to give $500,000 to food banks across the areas that Windermere serves.

The need has never been greater, so we’re partnering with the trusted Volunteers of America (VOA) of Snohomish County, who know how to stretch every dollar to its fullest extent and successfully manage many of the food banks and food pantries across the county. In addition, a portion of the total raised will go towards buying vegetable starts for the Martha Perry Veggie Garden (MPVG) managed by the Snohomish Garden Club (SGC)which will supply local food banks with thousands of pounds of fresh produce throughout the summer and early fall. 

Our team of agents at Windermere North will be planting close to an acre of starts on behalf of the VOA at the MPVG with the SGC the end of May into early June in small groups practicing proper social distancing. We have done this project for three years as a larger group and we are thrilled to creatively get it done this year. Food Banks have always coveted fresh produce and this effort will be more meaningful than ever this year.  

If you are able to give, any amount will help make an impact and directly benefit our Neighbors in Need: gf.me/u/xy7ikd

Thank you!!

 


Posted on April 29, 2020 at 1:11 PM
Windermere Real Estate North | Posted in Living, Local Market Analysis, Newsletter |

COVID-19 & the Real Estate Market: Real Time Numbers from the Front Lines – Where are we now?

I hope this newsletter finds you and yours feeling well and making the best of the Stay Home, Stay Healthy order. It has been my goal as we navigate the COVID-19 pandemic to help keep my clients informed on how this is affecting real estate. I have received many inquiries asking about how the real estate market in our area is faring during this time. Fortunately, I have access to Matthew Gardner, Windermere’s Chief Economist on a weekly basis. Matthew’s one of the most respected economists in the nation, specifically in relation to housing. Last week, I had the opportunity to sit in on a Zoom meeting with him and my colleagues to learn more about COVID-19 and the Western Washington real estate market, and I found his outlook reassuring. Below is the latest edition of a weekly video series that he is recording each Monday to help keep everyone informed and connected to meaningful data. Matthew Gardner and Steve Harney, another economist on the East Coast, are who I am looking to for answers in contrast to just turning on the news or reading the latest headlines. Please click on the image below to listen to Matthew. If you have any questions or want to discuss how this might affect your real estate position specifically, please reach out! It has always been my goal to help keep my clients informed and empower strong decisions, now more than ever.

The effects of the COVID-19 pandemic have surely been felt economically. A common question that I have been asked is, “Is this 2008 all over again?” The answer is “No!” As Matthew touched on above, this is a health crisis, not a housing crisis. Yes, we are headed toward a recession, but not one that is based in housing like The Great Recession of 2008. That recession was primarily based on predatory lending practices that put people into homes they could not afford with little to no down payments and horribly vetted credit. In fact, of the last five recessions, three did not see price depreciation in housing.

Take a look at the graph to the right, which shows the homeowner households in King County with more than 50% equity in their home. In Q4 of 2019, 43% of homeowners in King County were in a very healthy equity position, owing less than 50% of what their home was worth. I have been tracking sales weekly since March 1st, and prices remain strong. We have a very limited amount of inventory, rates remain low, and buyer demand is being fueled by these positive components. Our economy was formidable prior to this, indicating solid bedrock for recovery once we weather this storm that needs to be waited out. The Greater Seattle Area is particularly fortunate as many of our large businesses are centered in information technology and Amazon, which have both stayed active during this time.

 

 

Another aspect that is different from the 2008 Great Recession is that some banks and mortgage investors (servicers) are working with homeowners to provide mortgage relief. With the shutdown of so many businesses and services, job losses have been abundant. If you or someone you know would benefit from setting up a mortgage forbearance program or loan modification in order to alleviate the pressure of monthly payments right now, click on this link and have them contact their mortgage servicer today. The available programs that are offered will vary from one loan servicer to another, and are primarily available for loans that are owned by Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac (click on the appropriate link to help research who owns your loan). Make sure you consider the details and payback terms for your long-term financial health. The ability to protect this asset while waiting this out will protect one’s equity. This is a milestone opportunity and will ensure a strong housing market moving forward.

On Saturday, March 28th, Governor Inslee adjusted the Stay Home, Stay Healthy order in relation to how real estate services can be provided. The point of this was to get the 17,000 pending transactions in our state headed towards a successful close. This also opened up the option for real estate to transact in order to help homeowners who need to sell to become unstuck, and buyers who need housing to be placed. The adjustments were focused on creating safe housing and addressing economic needs. This is not business as usual and now more than ever, entering into a real estate purchase or sale takes a well-thought-out strategy. Public health and safety have become a part of that strategic plan and are of the highest priority to consider along with housing and financial needs. In fact, waiting it out will be the best choice for some. If you or someone you know needs some guidance or is in a position to buy or sell during the Stay Home, Stay Healthy orders, please reach out. Also, see below the restrictions that are in place to help ensure all of our safety.

 

 

 

The uncertainty of COVID-19 and all of its repercussions may leave you feeling helpless or anxious. Sometimes it might feel like the only thing we can do is stay home and wait. The good news is that there are some practical ways we can all help.

1. Give blood, if you can. Blood banks nationwide are in a state of crisis, with severe shortages due to an unprecedented number of blood drive cancellations. Even if your area has ordered residents to stay at home, going out to give blood is allowed as a volunteer activity to help meet essential needs. Go to Bloodworks Northwest or The American Red Cross to schedule an appointment.
*Blood banks are operating by appointment only to meet social distancing orders. Important note: Coronavirus has not been shown to be transmitted through blood transfusion.

2. Give to your local food bank. Cash or food donations are imperative right now, with so many of our neighbors out of work and facing economic uncertainty. You can do an online search for the closest food bank to you, or check out one of these local pantries.
Concern for Neighbors (Mountlake Terrace)
Lynnwood Food Bank
Edmonds Food Bank
Mukilteo Food Bank
Volunteers of America (Everett)
Snohomish Food Bank
Woodinville Storehouse
Canyon Hills Food Bank (Bothell)
Hopelink (Shoreline)

3.Donate to health care workers. Now more than ever before, we need to support our front-line healthcare workers, who are so bravely fighting COVID-19 and taking care of our sick loved ones. Most hospitals have a donation page, outlining what they are currently in need of. Not only are they desperate for personal protection equipment such as gloves and masks, but many facilities are also accepting food (snacks for health care workers), notes of encouragement, or monetary donations. Do a quick search for the hospital nearest you to see what they are lacking and how you can help. Here are a few to get you started.
UW Medicine
Swedish Hospital
Evergreen Hospital

4. Support local businesses. It is often said that small businesses are the backbone of America. Well, now is the time for us to rally and support the bedrock of our communities. Many restaurants are still open for take-out or delivery (have you tried Uber Eats, or Grubhub? These are great options, as you are not only supporting the corner pizza place, but the delivery driver as well), and many local shops are still selling online or offering curb-side pickup.
Some cities are rallying around their restaurants and shops by putting together a one-stop resource for who is open and what services are still available. I have linked a couple of local city’s lists below, including a very cool interactive map for the city of Seattle. For information on your city, try searching Facebook or looking up the city’s Chamber of Commerce website.
Seattle
Edmonds
Bothell / Kenmore
Everett

Take the challenge: the next time you think about ordering something on Amazon, stop and take a minute see if a local small business can fill that need for you instead.


Posted on April 6, 2020 at 5:43 PM
Windermere Real Estate North | Posted in Living |

Holiday Tree Lighting Celebrations

 

Kick off the holiday season with a community tree lighting celebration! Thanksgiving falls late on the calendar this year, so the Christmas festivities will be right on it’s heels. Some of these celebrations start as early as the day after Thanksgiving.

The bigger celebrations feature Santa’s arrival, and most of the communities will have fun activities designed to put you and your family in the holiday spirit with live music, refreshments, crafts, and other fun activities.

 

Nov. 29 – Bellevue at Bellevue Place

Nov. 29 – Seattle at Westlake Center

Nov. 30 – Seattle at Pike Place Market

Nov. 30 – Tacoma at the Broadway Center

Nov. 30 – Edmonds at Centennial Plaza

Dec. 1 –  Bothell on Main Street

Dec. 1 – Olympia at Sylvester Park

Dec. 6 – Mercer Island at Mercerdale Park

Dec. 6 – Mountlake Terrace at Evergreen Playfield

Dec. 6 – Renton at Coulon Park

Dec. 6 – Sammamish at City Hall

Dec. 6 – University Place (south of Tacoma)

Dec. 7 – Kenmore at City Hall

Dec. 7 – Kent at Kent Town Square Plaza

Dec 7 – Lynnwood at City Hall

Dec. 7 – Mill Creek on Main Street

Dec 7 – Mukilteo at Rosehill Community Center

Dec. 7 – West Seattle at West Seattle Junction

Dec 7 – Woodinville at DeYoung Park & Wilmot Gateway Park


Posted on November 8, 2019 at 11:00 AM
Windermere Real Estate North | Posted in Living |

How Long Things Last

We all know that nothing lasts forever, but when everything is working fine it is easy to forget that all of the systems and appliances in your home have a finite lifespan. Keep this information in mind, whether you are buying or selling a home, budgeting for improvements, or deciding between repairing and replacing.

Here’s a brief look at some of the components of your home and their average lifespans (courtesy of the National Association of Home Builders)

 

ROOFING, SIDING, WINDOWS & DECKS. You can expect slate or tile roofs to last around 50 years, wood shingles 25-30, metal will get you about 25 years, while asphalts typically last about 20 years. The lifespan for siding can vary quite a bit. Brick will last 100 years or more, aluminum about 80 years and stucco will probably last you 25 years. Wood siding can last anywhere from 10 to 100 years depending on the climate you live in and how it is maintained. Both aluminum and vinyl windows will last 15 to 20 years, while unclad wood windows can have a life of 30 years or more. Cedar decks will average 15-25 years as long as they are properly treated and cleaned, and a high quality composite deck will last 30 years with minimal maintenance.

 

FLOORING. The natural flooring materials such as wood, marble, slate or granite will all last 100 years or more, while tile has an average life of 70-100 years. Vinyl can last up to 50 years, while laminate and linoleum will get you up to 25 years. Expect your carpet to last 8-10 years, depending on use.

 

KITCHEN & BATH. Laminate countertops can have a life of 20 years or more, but it will vary depending on use. Wood, tile and stone should last a lifetime, and cultured marble will typically see a lifespan of 20 years. You can expect your stainless steel sink to last you about 30 years, while an enamel-coated sink will give you five to 10 years. Slate, granite, soapstone and copper will be around for 100 years or more. Bathroom faucets should give you about 20 years, and toilets will average a 50-year lifespan, although some of the parts will need replacing.

 

APPLIANCES. The lifespan of appliances will vary widely depending on the appliance, the brand, model, and use. Use these average lifespan numbers as a rough guide for when it may make more sense to replace rather than repair. Gas ranges tend to have the longest lifespan of your major appliances, giving around 15 years of use. Electric ranges on the other hand, are closer to 13 years, which is also the expected lifespan for standard refrigerators and clothes dryers. Your garbage disposal should give you about 10 years of use, while the dishwasher and microwave will be around nine years. You can expect your electric furnace to last about 15 years, 18 for gas and 20 for oil-burning. Central air systems will live 10 to 15 years on average.

 

Check out the NAHB website for more information.


Posted on October 2, 2019 at 10:43 AM
Windermere Real Estate North | Posted in Living |

Back to School Basics

 

The first day of school has snuck up on us again! Most local school districts will start just after Labor Day, so if you haven’t already, now is the time to start getting ready. Take advantage of these last weeks of summer to start settling into a new routine before life gets hectic.

 

Start talking about it. New teacher, new classmates, new schedules can all create some anxieties with kids. Start talking about school a few weeks before the first day. Talk about practical things like what the new schedule will be like, but also make sure to address their feelings and concerns about the upcoming year.

 

Ease back into the scheduled days. When you and your kids are used to lazy mornings and staying up late, shifting to the early morning school bus rush can be incredibly difficult. To ease the transition, start 7-10 days before school starts, and shift bedtimes and wake-up times gradually. Every day, start their bedtime routine 10-15 minutes earlier and wake them up 10-15 minutes earlier until they’re back on track. And don’t forget to readjust your bedtime schedule, too!

 

Re-set eating habits. When school starts, your student needs to maintain a high level of energy throughout the day. Implementing a routine for breakfast, lunch and snacks is just as important as their sleeping patterns. Begin this transition 7-10 days before school starts as well.

 

Inventory wardrobes. Before going school shopping, take some time to go through what you already have, donate things they’ve outgrown, and make a list of what is needed.

 

Go back to school shopping early. The store aisles are currently packed with school supplies. Take advantage of your summer schedule to shop while the store isn’t as busy and the supplies haven’t been picked through. Don’t forget to buy extras for homework time or the winter re-stock that inevitably happens in January.

 

Determine how your child will get to and from school and discuss it with your child so they know exactly what to expect. If they will be walking or biking, try to find a neighborhood buddy they can stick with, and be sure to practice the route with them.

 

Sync your calendars. If you don’t already have one, create a shared family calendar to track everyone’s activities and commitments. Add all the important school dates before the year starts, so important things like parent-teacher night aren’t missed, and everyone is on the same page.

 

Set rules for after school. After-school time and activities such as TV, video games, play time, and the completion of homework should be well-thought out in advance. Talk about the rules (and consequences) for these before school starts.

 

Set goals. Research shows that setting and tracking goals leads to success. Before school starts, talk to your child about some things they would like to accomplish this year. Write down their goal(s), post it somewhere visible in the house, and check in periodically with them to see how they are doing.

 

Implement a weekly family meeting. This will come in handy as the year goes on and schedules become fuller. Put it on the calendar and make it a priority: just a few minutes every week to sit down together, review the schedule for the coming week, and check in with each child about homework, projects, and goals. This is also a good time to clean out and organize backpacks and binders.

 


Posted on August 13, 2019 at 1:54 PM
Windermere Real Estate North | Posted in Living |

Get a Jump on Spring Cleaning

 

Whether you hire an outside professional for help, or tackle the project yourself, now is a great time to get a jump on spring cleaning. Many people wait for warmer temps to start cleaning, but I think most everyone can agree that those weekends would be better spent outdoors, soaking up that sun. So, take some inspiration from the list below to get you started now on freshening up your home for spring.

It will only take a few hours to check everything off this list, and you’ll feel so much better enjoying the last few weeks of winter, knowing that when the warmer weather finally comes, you can get outside and really enjoy it!

 

Rotate your mattress. Most mattresses need to be rotated regularly in order to even out the overall wear and prolong the lifespan of your bed. However, keep in mind that Sleep Number and Tempur-Pedic mattresses typically should not be rotated. Always check with your manufacturer for their recommendations on your specific mattress. If you own an older mattress with no pillowtop, it should probably be flipped as well as rotated.

 

Clean your mattress. Strip the mattress of all linens and covers. Start by vacuuming the mattress with the upholstery attachment, paying close attention to crevices and seams. Next, sprinkle baking soda (up to a one-pound box) all over the surface of your mattress. Let this sit for at least an hour, but 24 hours is best. Then go back over your mattress with your vacuum’s upholstery attachment again. If you have a steam cleaner, break it out and go over your whole mattress. The steam will reach further into the mattress than your vacuum is able to, and kills dust mites. *It is generally not recommended to clean memory foam with a steam cleaner.

 

Organize & clean the laundry room. Clean the outside of your washer and dryer; scrape any dried detergent from crevices. Next, clean the inside of the washing machine. Most newer models have a self-cleaning cycle. If you have an older machine that does not have a self-cleaning cycle, run a cycle with hot water and a quart of white vinegar. After it is finished, clean the detergent dispensers, using a vinegar and water solution and a scrubber. If you have a front-loader, be sure to clean the rubber seal on the door. This area is prone to mold growth, so use an all-purpose cleaner or maybe even bleach to get under and around the seal.

Next, organize a bit. Throw away products you never use, replace damaged sorting bins, and don’t forget to clean out the dryer vent to prevent a fire.

 

Deep clean the fridge. Twice a year (or more), you should give your fridge a front-to-back, top-down scrubbing. Start by taking everything out and throw away anything that has expired. Next, remove all the shelves and drawers. Put them to soak in a solution of two tablespoons baking soda and one-quart hot water. While they are soaking, wipe down the interior of the fridge with the same solution. Then scrub, rinse and dry the shelves and drawers.

Next, dry the drip pan. Remove the base grill, and pull out the drip pan. If it’s full of water, mop it with paper towels and wash the pan with soapy water. If your drop pan is fixed in place, wrap a cloth around the head of a long-handled brush and use to clean the pan.

Don’t forget the coils. In order to keep your refrigerator running efficiently, unplug it, pull it away from the wall, and use a coil brush or your vacuum’s crevice attachment to clean the condenser coils. This should be done at least twice a year, unless you have pets in the home, and then you should do this three to four times a year.

 

Clean out spice cabinet. Throw away all expired spices and seasonings. Not only do these lose taste, they actually harbor mold and bacteria.

 

Clean out expired medications & vitamins If you have unused medications, please take them to your local pharmacy for proper disposal.

 

Vacuum, wash, or steam window curtains

 

Wash window blinds

 

Add color to your table. Treat yourself to fresh flowers while waiting for the spring blooms outside.

 

And if you’re ready to get some deep cleaning done, check out this blog for the Ultimate Spring Cleaning Checklist.

 

 


Posted on February 16, 2019 at 3:53 PM
Windermere Real Estate North | Posted in Living | Tagged , , , ,

5 Alternatives to a New Year’s Resolution

The pressure to come up with resolutions and improvements always mounts near the end of the year, but everyone knows that statistically speaking, most of us won’t stick to our New Year’s resolutions much past February. So rather than give in to societal pressure, guilt, and feelings of hopelessness, I propose a shift in perspective this year.

Rather than viewing the New Year as catalyst for sweeping lifestyle and character changes, let’s instead take this opportunity to renew our sense of purpose and determination. Here are five ideas to make some positive changes in a different way this year.

  1. Express Gratitude

“Gratitude can transform common days into thanksgivings, turn routine jobs into joy, and change ordinary opportunities into blessings.” -William Arthur Ward. You will be amazed at the ways your life will begin to change simply by expressing gratitude regularly. It will help you maintain a fresh perspective day in and day out, and will help to keep stress at bay. Make a list of all the things you are thankful for in your life, big and small. Take some time to really lean in to this list and reflect on each one. Especially focus on why you are thankful for each of those things.

  1. Create a list of things to look forward to

This goes hand-in-hand with gratitude. What are you looking forward to this year? A vacation, a family member getting married, a new restaurant opening, a new novel or a new season of your favorite show. By focusing on the good things coming your way, it will be easier to keep a positive and hope-filled attitude.

  1. Pick a word for the year

Before the year starts, take some time to look at the big picture of the coming year. Find the theme of what you would like to accomplish or focus on, and chose a theme word to guide you. This will give you clarity and focus. Maybe your word for the year is Intentional. Simplify. Peace. Discipline. Fun. When you have your theme word for the year, share it on oneword365.com

  1. Schedule a quarterly retreat

Life happens, and trying to balance work, family, social life, friends, and other commitments often results in very little time for you. Take some time before the new year starts and schedule yourself a quarterly one-day (or weekend!) retreat to focus on YOU. Remember, if you don’t take care of yourself, you won’t be able to take care of anyone else.

  1. Try a 30-day challenge

A 30-day challenge consists of setting a small goal that can be achieved in 30 days, as well as a small, specific action that you will take each day to achieve that goal. For example:

Declutter: every day for 30 days, choose 3 items to donate, sell, give away or throw away.

Random acts of kindness: every day for 30 days, perform a random act of kindness such as: leaving change in a vending machine; buying the coffee of the person behind you at Starbucks; send a thank you email to a coworker who deserves more recognition. Spreading kindness will always come back to you.

 

 

Happy New Year!


Posted on December 2, 2018 at 6:37 PM
Windermere Real Estate North | Posted in Living |

Where to Celebrate NYE

New Year’s Eve 2018 is almost upon us, and if you are still looking for something to do, read on! There are lots of options in the greater Seattle area, whether you are looking for the biggest blow-out bash or an earlier, family-friendly event.

  1. New Year’s Eve Celebration at Seattle Center

There are actually two parties that will converge at midnight for the iconic Seattle fireworks show.

The Armory Stage will host rock band SWAY from 8pm until midnight. And at the International Fountain, you can dance the night away with live electronic music and video projection show (starts at 10pm). Tickets are required for both parties, however the big fireworks show is free to enjoy.

  1. SPECTRA: New Year’s Eve Under the Arches

The Pacific Science Center transforms on NYE with fire sculptures, drinks and live music. There will be special entertainment throughout the night, as well as the standard Science Center exhibits. At midnight, head outside for the Space Needle fireworks. Purchase tickets in advance.

  1. New Year’s Eve pARTy at Chihuly Gardens and Glass

Watch the Seattle Center fireworks from under the glass of Chihuly Gardens. The evening includes appetizers, desserts, live music and a midnight toast. Purchase tickets in advance.

  1. INDULGENCE New Year’s Eve Bash at MoPOP

Another Seattle Center option, the Museum of Popular Culture offers four 21+ parties in one. With live music on three performance stages, comedians, party favors, special VIP areas, more than 20 bars, and a special singles-only cocktail hour, this is one of the largest parties of the year. Museum access is included in the price of the party, purchase tickets in advance.

  1. Tacoma’s First Night

First Night is an all-ages, family-friendly celebration in Downtown Tacoma’s Theater District. The affordable admission price includes museums, music, art, drama, dance, and a whole day and night of activities. The cost of entry increases as the festival gets closer, so buy early to save!

  1. Nighttime Party for Families at Imagine Children’s Museum

The perfect NYE celebration if you have older kids, this pajama party features comedians, balloon makers, pizza, snacks, and educational, hands-on activities throughout the night. The fun culminates at 9pm with a ball drop.

  1. New Year’s Eve with Ivar’s Salmon House

Ivar’s on Northlake will host live music, tasty food and view of the fireworks without the crowds. Advanced reservations are required, and will range in price depending on your selections.

  1. Slamming’ Jammin’ New Year’s Eve Party

Ring in the new year with the latest in R&B, Old School, Jazz and Hip Hop music. This is a 21+, semi-formal event, and hotel packages are available with your ticket purchase.

  1. Resolution New Year’s Eve Party at WAMU Theater

A Seattle tradition for almost a decade, this 18+ party always brings a mixed crowd together for a night of dancing. This is one of the biggest EDM parties of the year.

  1. New Year’s at KidsQuest Bellevue

Celebrate the coming new year all day at KidsQuest! There are activities every hour from 10am to 4pm, including Bubble Wrap Stomp, New Year’s Hats, Storytime, glittery tattoos, and more. Admission is free with membership or museum admission.


Posted on December 2, 2018 at 6:33 PM
Windermere Real Estate North | Posted in Living |